https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases2020-07-01T01:26:37.435ZPress ReleasesAdobe Experience ManagerVillanova Receives Funding for COVID-19 Response Through Manufacturing Innovation Challengenoemail@noemail.orgsarnol05<div class="textimage_829206557 textimage parbase rightimage nostyle"> <div class="image pull-right" id="cq-textimage-jsp-/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/villanova-receives-funding-for-covid-19-response-through-manufac/jcr:content/pagecontent/textimage_829206557" style="max-width: 50%;"> <img src="https://www1.villanova.edu/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/villanova-receives-funding-for-covid-19-response-through-manufac/jcr%3acontent/pagecontent/textimage_829206557/image.img.jpg/1593027350093.jpg" alt="file" title="" class="cq-dd-image" ><br> <small>Moeness Amin and C. Nataraj</small> </div> <div class="text"><p>Two Villanova University College of Engineering initiatives were among seven projects at four Pennsylvania universities to be awarded $174,603 in new funding through the Manufacturing PA Innovation Program COVID-19 Challenge to address the commonwealth’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Moeness Amin, director of the Center for Advanced Communications, received $24,802 for “COVID-19 Risk Monitoring by Wearable Sensor with Machine Learning Processing on Mobile Device.” A second $24,815 grant was awarded for “Design and Development of NovaVent,” a low-cost, rapidly manufacturable ventilator under the leadership of Dr. C. Nataraj, director of Villanova’s Center for Analytics of Dynamic Systems.</p> <p><b>COVID-19 Risk Monitoring by Wearable Sensor</b></p> <p>In Pennsylvania, a large percentage of the COVID-19-related deaths have occurred in residents in nursing or personal care homes. In many cases, by the time an individual becomes aware of and recognizes any single or multiple COVID-19 symptoms, they are already in danger of permanent health damage or death. In this respect, an accurate, easy-to-use capability to monitor at-risk individuals for early signs of COVID-19 infection is urgently needed.</p> <p>In partnership with <a href="https://rtmvitalsigns.com/">RTM Vital Signs, LLC</a>, this project under the leadership of Dr. Amin aims at developing a full monitoring system that consists of an integrated sensor and smartphone application, which will work as follows:</p> <ul> <li>The sensor accurately measures the individual’s temperature, heart rate, oxygen saturation and tracheal sound.</li> <li>The mobile device receives these data wirelessly, and through an app, executes effective signal processing algorithms and machine learning techniques to extract the respiratory rate and classify the individual’s breathing conditions and disorders.</li> <li>The app computes a risk-index-score that produces a series of alerts/alarms (visual, auditory, and vibratory) that warn the patient and/or medical professional of worsening pulmonary function.</li> </ul> <p>Dr. Amin notes that the sensor itself was recently developed by RTM for opioid overdose detection using an acoustic sensing modality and has since been modified and extended to include temperature and oxygen saturation markers that underlie the COVID-19 infection. RTM’s CEO and co-founder is <a href="https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2019/0510-1.html">Dr. Nance Dicciani <b>’</b>69</a>, a Villanova Chemical Engineering graduate and former member of the Villanova University Board of Trustees.</p> <p><b>Design and Development of NovaVent</b></p> <p>Mechanical ventilation is a critical element in treating many patients who are affected by the COVID-19 virus. With an interdisciplinary team of engineering and medical specialists, Villanovans designed and fabricated a functional, first generation prototype of <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/leahrosenbaum/2020/04/30/as-coronavirus-spreads-globally-these-researchers-are-designing-ventilators-that-cost-less-than-1000/#76068285cb2e">NovaVent</a>, a low-cost (&lt;$1K), open source ventilator that operates in a mode of continuous mandatory ventilation (CMV) intended for patients who are incapable of breathing on their own.  </p> <p>With funding through the COVID-19 Challenge grant, the team intends to build on its preliminary design and pursue research to design NovaVent 2.0. This second iteration will be capable of more sophisticated modes of ventilation and will integrate additional control mechanisms and features more commonly found in expensive high-end ventilators. The Villanova team will then work with Pennsylvania manufacturers to produce near commercial grade components for NovaVent and engage Geisinger Health System for medical input. Testing will be conducted on the breathing simulator at CHOP and validated at Emergency Care Research Institute (ECRI), both of which agreed to offer their services at no-cost to this project. Dr. Nataraj adds, “We will also explore opportunities to distribute NovaVent to international locations through our network of service organizations.”</p> <p>In a <a href="https://www.governor.pa.gov/newsroom/gov-wolf-four-universities-receive-funding-for-covid-19-response-through-manufacturing-innovation-challenge/">press release</a> issued by the Department of Community and Economic Development, PA Governor Tom Wolf said: “We are fortunate to have some of the brightest minds in our higher education system, and they rose to the challenge in supporting our commonwealth during this unprecedented time. My administration remains committed to identifying new resources that can support our state’s businesses and communities as we continue to navigate this pandemic and the recovery steps ahead.”</p> </div><div class="clear"></div></div>Two Villanova University College of Engineering initiatives were among seven projects at four Pennsylvania universities to be awarded $174,603 in new funding through the Manufacturing PA Innovation Program COVID-19 Challenge to address the commonwealth’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/villanova-receives-funding-for-covid-19-response-through-manufac2020-06-24T19:35:50.101Z2020-06-24T19:35:50.101ZVillanova President the Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, Named Chair of BIG EAST Board of Directorsnoemail@noemail.orgjgust<div class="textimage parbase rightimage nostyle"> <div class="image pull-right" id="cq-textimage-jsp-/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0609/jcr:content/pagecontent/textimage" style="max-width: 50%;"> <img src="https://www1.villanova.edu/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0609/jcr%3acontent/pagecontent/textimage/image.img.jpg/1591708868791.jpg" alt="The Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, President of Villanova University" title="" class="cq-dd-image" ><br> </div> <div class="text"><p><b>NEW YORK</b> – The Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, President of Villanova University, has been elected Chair of the BIG EAST Conference Board of Directors, effective July 1, 2020. The Board of Directors is comprised of the Presidents of the BIG EAST's member institutions.<br> &nbsp;<br> The BIG EAST has also announced the formation of a conference-wide COVID-19 Task Force to provide guidance and develop recommendations to assist member schools in safely resuming and conducting athletics activities. In addition, the conference announced plans for a regionalized scheduling model for conference play in fall 2020. The changes were approved by the league's Directors of Athletics.&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;<br> Fr. Donohue replaces James M. Danko, President of Butler University, who has served as BIG EAST Board Chair since 2018. Fr. Donohue has served as BIG EAST Vice-Chair for the past two years and has been an Executive Committee member since 2016.&nbsp; Rev. Michael J. Graham, S.J., President of Xavier University, was selected to fill the Vice-Chair position, and Rev. Daniel Hendrickson, S.J., President of Creighton University, has been appointed to the Executive Committee as a new member.&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;<br> Fr. Donohue has served as Villanova's 32<sup>nd</sup> President since 2006. He played a leading role in the formation of the current BIG EAST configuration in 2013, which returned the league to its basketball-centric heritage. Under Donohue's stewardship, Villanova won NCAA national titles in men's basketball in 2016 and 2018 and was the recipient of the BIG EAST Presidents' Award in 2015, 2016 and 2018. The award annually recognizes a member school that has excelled at the highest levels of academics, athletics and citizenship during the preceding academic year.<br> &nbsp;<br> The Executive Committee appointments were made in conjunction with the annual spring meeting of the BIG EAST Board of Directors, which was conducted remotely. NCAA President Mark Emmert addressed the group on national issues, including strategies to address COVID-19 and developments surrounding name, image and likeness (NIL) in college athletics. The Presidents were also briefed on the progress of the BIG EAST COVID-19 Task Force, whose members include national health experts, athletics administrators, head coaches, physicians, trainers, event/facility personnel and student-athletes. The task force roster appears at the end of this release.&nbsp;</p> <p>For more on the BIG EAST's announcement, the COVID-19 Task Force and the fall sports scheduling changes, <a href="https://villanova.com/news/2020/6/8/field-hockey-villanova-president-the-rev-peter-m-donohue-osa-phd-named-chair-of-big-east-board-of-directors.aspx"><u>click here</u></a>.<br> &nbsp;<br> <b><u>THE BIG EAST</u></b></p> <p>The BIG EAST Conference is an association of ten nationally prominent colleges and universities that foster healthy athletic competition, community service and the pursuit of excellence in academic environments. The athletic programs of BIG EAST institutions provide national-caliber participation opportunities for more than 3,700 student-athletes on over 180 men's and women's teams in 22 sports. Established in 1979 and headquartered in New York City, the BIG EAST's members are located in seven of the country's top 36 largest media markets and include Butler University, Creighton University, DePaul University, Georgetown University, Marquette University, Providence College, St. John's University, Seton Hall University, Villanova University and Xavier University. The University of Connecticut will become a member on July 1, 2020. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.bigeast.com/">www.bigeast.com</a>.</p> <p><br> <u><b>VILLANOVA UNIVERSITY</b></u></p> <p>Since 1842, Villanova University’s Augustinian Catholic intellectual tradition has been the cornerstone of an academic community in which students learn to think critically, act compassionately and succeed while serving others. There are more than 10,000 undergraduate, graduate and law students in the University's six colleges—the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Villanova School of Business, the College of Engineering, the M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, the College of Professional Studies and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. Ranked among the nation’s top universities, Villanova supports its students’ intellectual growth and prepares them to become ethical leaders who create positive change everywhere life takes them. For more, visit&nbsp;<a href="http://www.villanova.edu/"><b>www.villanova.edu</b></a>.</p> <p><br> <u><b>VILLANOVA ATHLETICS</b></u></p> <p>Villanova University has a long and storied athletics history defined by excellence both in competition and in the classroom. The Villanova Athletics Department is a community of student-athletes, coaches and staff whose primary focus is to achieve academic excellence, while striving to produce teams and individuals committed to athletic competition and outstanding performance. Villanova Athletics sponsors 24 varsity sports, which together include more than 550 student-athletes. Villanova is a member of the BIG EAST Conference, CAA Football, Colonial Athletic Association (Rowing) and Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (Water Polo).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div><div class="clear"></div></div>The Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, President of Villanova University, has been elected Chair of the BIG EAST Conference Board of Directors, effective July 1, 2020. The Board of Directors is comprised of the Presidents of the BIG EAST's member institutions.https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/06092020-06-09T13:24:34.797Z2020-06-09T13:24:34.797ZNew Book by Villanova Student on Living with Type 1 Diabetes Shares Personal Experience and Inspirationnoemail@noemail.orgjgust<div class="text parbase"><h3><b>Type 1 Diabetes has taught Morgan Panzirer to live every day to its fullest and is the focus of her new book, “Actually, I Can: Growing Up with Type 1 Diabetes, A Story of Unexpected Empowerment”</b></h3> </div> <div class="textimage parbase rightimage nostyle"> <div class="image pull-right" id="cq-textimage-jsp-/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0603/jcr:content/pagecontent/textimage" style="max-width: 50%;"> <img src="https://www1.villanova.edu/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0603/jcr%3acontent/pagecontent/textimage/image.img.jpg/1591192292030.jpg" alt="A new book by Villanova student Morgan Panzirer on living with Type 1 Diabetes shares personal experience and inspiration" title="A new book by Villanova student Morgan Panzirer on living with Type 1 Diabetes shares personal experience and inspiration" class="cq-dd-image" ><br> <small>Villanova student Morgan Panzirer is a Biology major with plans to attend medical school for pediatric endocrinology after she graduates. She shares her experiences, and insight, on living with Type 1 Diabetes in a new book.</small> </div> <div class="text"><p>The sky is the limit for Villanova rising sophomore Morgan Panzirer. A Biology major with plans to attend medical school for pediatric endocrinology after she graduates, Panzirer is also a member of the University’s Equestrian Team. But she had to overcome many challenges to get to this point. At six years old, Panzirer was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D), an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks and kills its own insulin-producing cells. After facing her diagnosis and learning how to control the impact of the disease on her life, she became a vocal advocate in the fight against T1D. Now, Panzirer shares her experiences, insight, and inspiration in a new book, “Actually, I Can: Growing Up with Type 1 Diabetes, A Story of Unexpected Empowerment” (T1D Media), coming out June 9.</p> <p>T1D – a life-altering autoimmune disease, which cannot be prevented and does not have a cure – affects nearly 1.6 million people in the United States alone. Panzirer experienced the effects of living with the disease first-hand and wanted to be a voice to other families and children facing Type 1.</p> <p>“As time went by and I really started to understand the ins and outs of this disease, I realized that there was not enough outreach to support people battling T1D,” said Panzirer. “For that reason, I decided to use my platform of being a young person with Type 1 to help the general public understand the severity and need for research.”</p> <p>Panzirer’s advocacy work began in 2009 when she attended Children’s Congress – an event that takes kids with Type 1 Diabetes from each state and brings them to Washington D.C. to speak with their state’s senators and lobby for funding. Since that time, she has continued to advocate on behalf of people living with Type 1 Diabetes, focusing on the importance of finding a cure, advancing better treatments, and improving the quality of life for those suffering from diabetes. In addition to Children’s Congress, Panzirer has spoken at numerous events around the world, including the Stem for Life Conference in Vatican City, Italy, and met with leaders including Pope Francis and President Barack Obama.</p> <p>It was in seventh grade that Panzirer came up with the idea to write a book about living with T1D. After a couple years of writing, she put aside the work in progress, occasionally finding it again and adding ideas and experiences. There came a point where she had not looked at the book for more than a year – that is until her senior year of high school. It was at that time when she decided to ask her English teacher for feedback – which Panzirer hoped would provide her insight as to whether it was a project worth completing.</p> <p>“I had no idea whether it was worth continuing or not,” said Panzirer. “My teacher loved it – and had some amazing ideas for how I could enhance it and connect the part I had written when I was younger, to a newer, more mature version of the book.”</p> <p>Panzirer continued work on her book and in November 2019, during her freshman year at Villanova, found a publisher for the project.</p> <p>“The day I signed with my publisher was one of the best,” notes Panzirer. “It was amazing that all of my hard work that I put in over the years was finally paying off. My goal in this whole project was to be able to empower other people living with T1D by sharing my story, and when I had the privilege to sign with a publisher who could help me do that, I felt like it was the first step in making my dream a reality.”</p> <p>Panzirer hopes others can gain perspective from her experiences.</p> <p>“It [Type 1 Diabetes] has made me appreciate every hour, every minute, and every second I stand on this Earth. But the truth is everyone should live this way, because you don’t know if you’ll receive life-changing news tomorrow, and you don’t know if today is your last day,” Panzirer writes in her book. “Everyone has obstacles in their lives; it’s just the way life is. But you don’t have to sit there and let them beat you down. Defeat them. Strength is a choice, and if you tell yourself you can get through whatever you’re battling, then you can.”</p> </div><div class="clear"></div></div>Villanova student Morgan Panzirer was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) at the age of six. After facing her diagnosis and learning how to control the impact of the disease on her life, she became a vocal advocate in the fight against T1D. Now, Panzirer shares her experiences, insight, and inspiration in a new book, “Actually, I Can: Growing Up with Type 1 Diabetes, A Story of Unexpected Empowerment.” https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/06032020-06-03T13:51:32.038Z2020-06-03T13:51:32.038ZVillanova University’s Newest Living and Learning Community, The Commons, Certified LEED Silvernoemail@noemail.orgzchizar<div class="textimage parbase rightimage nostyle"> <div class="image pull-right" id="cq-textimage-jsp-/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0529/jcr:content/pagecontent/textimage" style="max-width: 300px;"> <img src="https://www1.villanova.edu/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0529/jcr%3acontent/pagecontent/textimage/image.img.jpg/1590768622636.jpg" alt="The Commons" title="Commons" class="cq-dd-image" ><br> </div> <div class="text"><p><i>VILLANOVA</i>, <i>Pa.</i> — Villanova University’s newest living-learning community, The Commons, has received Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver certification by the US Green Building Council. The most widely used green building rating system in the world, LEED is a recognized symbol of sustainability achievement. The certification highlights projects that create healthy, highly efficient and cost-saving green buildings. <a href="https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2019/0822.html">Dedicated</a> in August 2019, The Commons is the <a href="https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/sustainability/CampusSustainabilityBuildingsGroundsStormwaterDiningRecycling/BuildingsSustainability.html">eighth Villanova LEED certified building</a>.</p> <p>Highlights from the University’s Silver certification include:</p> <ul> <li>43 percent potable water reduction </li> <li>Expect to see a 17 percent cost savings from energy usage</li> <li>100 percent of the electricity needed to operate The Commons is powered by renewable energy </li> <li>87 percent of waste from the site was diverted from a landfill either through recycling or reuse</li> </ul> <p>The Commons boasts several additional sustainable benefits in its design. On the outside, all light fixtures are dark sky compliant, reducing light pollution. Two cisterns located underground collect stormwater from the roofs, filter the water and re-use it as makeup water to the high efficiency cooling systems for the buildings. Three bioswales along Lancaster Avenue, designed as walls with seating, remove debris and pollution from surface water runoff. In all, it is estimated that 400,000 gallons of water can be saved each year with this sustainable infrastructure. These areas are also used as stormwater test sites, allowing College of Engineering faculty and students to further their cutting-edge research in the areas of stormwater management and green infrastructure. Inside the buildings are energy-efficient and motion sensor light fixtures and low-flow plumbing fixtures to help reduce energy costs.</p> <p>The Commons consist of six apartment-style residence halls which house 1,135 students, allowing Villanova to now offer housing to 85 percent of its students. Part of a $225 million transformation of the institution’s former surface parking lots along Lancaster Avenue/Route 30, construction for the project began in November 2015 and was completed in June 2019. The Commons also include the University’s first restaurant, The Refectory, as well as a grab-and-go coffee shop and café  two fitness centers equipped with weights, cardiovascular training equipment and aerobics class space for spin classes, etc.; IT TechZone space for students to connect, collaborate and innovate; six community rooms; a smart-locker mailroom; and outdoor courtyards for students to meet and study.</p> <p>Villanova continues to be recognized as one of the nation’s greenest colleges, having received national recognition for its commitment to sustainability by a number of organizations including the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). Villanova recycles and composts 27 percent of its waste, sending all of its trash to Covanta, an energy-from-waste facility that burns the trash for electricity. The University has installed over 80 hydration stations on campus to make it more convenient to fill up reusable water bottles. The initiative has already saved the equivalent of more than 3.4 million water bottles. Villanova also incorporates its commitment to the environment into its community service initiatives. To learn more about Villanova’s commitment to environmental sustainability, click <a href="http://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/sustainability.html"><b>here</b></a>.</p> <p><b><i>About Villanova University:</i></b> <i>Since 1842, Villanova University’s Augustinian Catholic intellectual tradition has been the cornerstone of an academic community in which students learn to think critically, act compassionately and succeed while serving others. There are more than 10,000 undergraduate, graduate and law students in the University's six colleges—the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Villanova School of Business, the College of Engineering, the M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, the College of Professional Studies and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. Ranked among the nation’s top universities, Villanova supports its students’ intellectual growth and prepares them to become ethical leaders who create positive change everywhere life takes them. For more, visit </i><a href="http://www.villanova.edu/"><i>www.villanova.edu</i></a><i>.</i><b></b></p> </div><div class="clear"></div></div>The most widely used green building rating system in the world, LEED is a recognized symbol of sustainability achievement. The certification highlights projects that create healthy, highly efficient and cost-saving green buildings. Dedicated in August 2019, The Commons is the eighth Villanova LEED certified building. https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/05292020-05-29T16:10:22.646Z2020-05-29T16:10:22.646ZTwo Villanova University Professors Receive CAREER Grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF)noemail@noemail.orgjgust<div class="text parbase"><h3><b>Since 2017, seven Villanova faculty members have now received NSF CAREER Awards</b></h3> <h3>&nbsp;</h3> </div> <div class="textimage parbase rightimage nostyle"> <div class="image pull-right" id="cq-textimage-jsp-/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0526/jcr:content/pagecontent/textimage" style="max-width: 50%;"> <img src="https://www1.villanova.edu/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0526/jcr%3acontent/pagecontent/textimage/image.img.jpg/1590510776189.jpg" alt="Two Villanova University Professors Receive CAREER Grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF)" title="" class="cq-dd-image" ><br> <small>Pictured left to right: Scott Dietrich, PhD, assistant professor of Physics, and Joseph Toscano, PhD, assistant professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences, named recipients of NSF CAREER Awards.</small> </div> <div class="text"><p><i>VILLANOVA, Pa.</i> — Two faculty members from Villanova University’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been named recipients of the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The awards will allow Scott Dietrich, PhD, assistant professor of Physics, and Joseph Toscano, PhD, assistant professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences, to advance research in the areas of quantum electronics and language processing, respectively. Both professors received five-year grants, Dietrich for $594,000 and Toscano for $605,000.</p> <p>Since 2017, seven Villanova faculty members have received NSF CAREER Awards, the most prestigious award supporting career-development activities for teacher-scholars who most effectively integrate research and education within the context of the mission of their organization.</p> <p>“The continued selection of Villanova professors as NSF CAREER Award recipients highlights the talent and impact of our outstanding teacher-scholars,” said Amanda Grannas, PhD, Associate Vice Provost for Research, Chief Research Officer and professor of Chemistry. Grannas, a 2006 recipient of an NSF CAREER Award, continued, “This award has a transformative effect on the research trajectory of early-career faculty. We congratulate Dr. Dietrich and Dr. Toscano on this momentous achievement.”   </p> <p>Dietrich, an expert in nanoelectronics—the use of nanotechnology in electronic components—will investigate the collective behavior of electrons by using microwave radiation to characterize new electronic phases and properties, the discovery of which can ultimately lead to the development of new technologies. Dietrich’s project, “Microwave Transmission Spectroscopy of Van Der Waals Materials,” will involve Villanova STEM undergraduate and graduate researchers. The team will measure the properties of fragile electronic states in highly interacting electronic systems.</p> <p>“This grant will enable us to address fundamental questions at the frontiers of highly interacting electronic systems in materials that will advance the field of quantum electronics,” Dietrich said.</p> <p>Dietrich and his students will use microwave transmission spectroscopy to study collective electronic states in van der Waals materials at low temperatures and high magnetic fields by coupling microwave radiation to the two-dimensional electron system through an adjacent coplanar waveguide. The project will include the design and introduction of a new interdisciplinary nanofabrication course that will bring together Villanova Physics and Engineering students in one classroom and laboratory.</p> <p>In addition, Dietrich’s grant will support educational outreach focusing on K-12 students in the greater Philadelphia region through partnerships with local libraries, as well as with public and private schools.</p> <p>Toscano, an expert in human speech recognition and language comprehension, will investigate how people understand spoken language in different contexts by studying brain responses to speech and developing computer models that recognize spoken words. Language is involved in nearly every aspect of our daily lives, but researchers do not fully understand how the brain transforms sounds into meaningful words. As part of their research, Toscano and his students will measure brain responses occurring in the first few hundred milliseconds after hearing a sound. By studying these early brain responses, they hope to determine how a listener’s expectation influences their perception.</p> <p>“Our goal is to provide insights into the neuroscience of speech perception and help us understand how we can build computer systems that process language in ways similar to humans,” said Toscano. “We will be able to identify what information the listener uses to form these expectations, allowing them to quickly and accurately understand spoken language.”</p> <p>The research team will also create neural network models that use techniques from machine learning to recognize speech and are trained in a way that mimics how children learn language. The behavior of the model will be compared with data from human listeners to determine whether it captures the way the brain understands spoken language and whether it forms the same kinds of expectations as listeners.</p> <p>The techniques developed from this research will also be used in classroom and laboratory settings to train undergraduate and graduate students in advanced computational and neuroscience techniques.</p> <p><b><i>About Villanova University:</i></b><i> Since 1842, Villanova University’s Augustinian Catholic intellectual tradition has been the cornerstone of an academic community in which students learn to think critically, act compassionately and succeed while serving others. There are more than 10,000 undergraduate, graduate and law students in the University's six colleges—the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Villanova School of Business, the College of Engineering, the M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, the College of Professional Studies and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. Ranked among the nation’s top universities, Villanova supports its students’ intellectual growth and prepares them to become ethical leaders who create positive change everywhere life takes them. For more, visit </i><a href="http://www.villanova.edu/"><i>www.villanova.edu</i></a><i>.</i></p> </div><div class="clear"></div></div>Two faculty members from Villanova University’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been named recipients of the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The awards will allow Scott Dietrich, PhD, assistant professor of Physics, and Joseph Toscano, PhD, assistant professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences, to advance research in the areas of quantum electronics and language processing, respectively. https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/05262020-05-26T16:32:56.379Z2020-05-26T16:32:56.379ZVillanova University Names the Rev. Kevin DePrinzio, OSA, PhD, Vice President for Mission and Ministrynoemail@noemail.orgjgust<div class="textimage parbase rightimage nostyle"> <div class="image pull-right" id="cq-textimage-jsp-/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0514/jcr:content/pagecontent/textimage" style="max-width: 50%;"> <img src="https://www1.villanova.edu/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0514/jcr%3acontent/pagecontent/textimage/image.img.jpg/1589462401225.jpg" alt="Villanova University has announced the appointment of the Rev. Kevin DePrinzio, OSA, PhD, as Vice President for Mission and Ministry." title="" class="cq-dd-image" ><br> <small>Villanova University has announced the appointment of the Rev. Kevin DePrinzio, OSA, PhD, as Vice President for Mission and Ministry.</small> </div> <div class="text"><p><i>VILLANOVA, Pa. –</i> Villanova University President, the Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, has announced the appointment of the Rev. Kevin DePrinzio, OSA, PhD, as Vice President for Mission and Ministry, effective July 1, 2020. As Vice President, he will oversee the University’s Office for Mission and Ministry, which plays a vital role in ensuring Villanova’s commitment to living out its Augustinian Catholic mission in every aspect of University life. Father DePrinzio succeeds Dr. Barbara Wall, founder of the Office for Mission and Ministry, who is retiring after 50 years at the University.</p> <p>“The Office for Mission and Ministry is essential to the Villanova community, as it plays an integral role in preserving our Augustinian mission,” said the Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, Villanova University President. “The work of this Office is at the very heart of who we are as a Catholic community. Father Kevin’s vision—engaging the University in its entirety and challenging our members to reflect on our mission consistently and practice it creatively—immediately stood out to me and the search committee. Under Father Kevin’s leadership, I have no doubt that the Office, and our mission, will continue to flourish. I very much look forward to working with him in this new role.”</p> <p>Fr. DePrinzio brings nearly 20 years of experience in ministry as a vocation director, campus minister and faculty member to the position. He will be responsible for the wide array of scholarly and pastoral programs offered by the Office for Mission and Ministry, which coordinates initiatives connected to Villanova’s Augustinian heritage and Catholic identity; promotes programs and research on contemporary issues through the lens of Catholic Social Teaching; attends to the University community’s spiritual and sacramental needs; and provides faith-based opportunities for students, faculty and staff of various religious beliefs and traditions.</p> <p>Since his profession to the Augustinian Order in 2000 and ordination in 2004, Fr. DePrinzio has held numerous teaching, vocational and ministry roles. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Theology at Villanova and has been heavily involved in the work of the Augustinian Institute, serving as a facilitator and panelist for the Institute’s various programming. Fr. DePrinzio also served as a mentor for the Faith &amp; Learning Scholar program and has been a member of various retreats, including the <i>Pellegrinaggio</i>, sponsored through Mission and Ministry.</p> <p>Before joining the Villanova University faculty, Fr. DePrinzio was the Vocation Director for the Augustinian friars in the Province of St. Thomas of Villanova and worked as a campus minister in Villanova’s Center for Worship and Spirituality. He was also an adjunct professor and campus minster at Merrimack College, as well as a teacher and school minister at Monsignor Bonner High School in Drexel Hill, Pa.</p> <p>Fr. DePrinzio earned a Bachelor of Arts in English from Saint Joseph’s University; a Master of Divinity and a Master of Arts from Washington Theological Union; and a Master of Philosophy and a PhD in Theology from the Catholic University of America.</p> <p><b><i>About Villanova University:</i></b> <i>Since 1842, Villanova University’s Augustinian Catholic intellectual tradition has been the cornerstone of an academic community in which students learn to think critically, act compassionately and succeed while serving others. There are more than 10,000 undergraduate, graduate and law students in the University's six colleges—the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Villanova School of Business, the College of Engineering, the M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, the College of Professional Studies and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. Ranked among the nation’s top universities, Villanova supports its students’ intellectual growth and prepares them to become ethical leaders who create positive change everywhere life takes them. For more, visit&nbsp;</i><a href="http://www.villanova.edu/"><i>www.villanova.edu</i></a><i>.</i></p> </div><div class="clear"></div></div>Villanova University President, the Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, has announced the appointment of the Rev. Kevin DePrinzio, OSA, PhD, as Vice President for Mission and Ministry, effective July 1, 2020. As Vice President, he will oversee the University’s Office for Mission and Ministry, which plays a vital role in ensuring Villanova’s commitment to living out its Augustinian Catholic mission in every aspect of University life. https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/05142020-05-14T14:22:01.054Z2020-05-14T14:22:01.054ZVillanova University Humanities Receives $3.9 million Templeton Foundation Grantnoemail@noemail.orgjgust<div class="text parbase"><h3>The grant marks the largest in the history of Villanova’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences</h3> <h3>&nbsp;</h3> </div> <div class="textimage parbase rightimage nostyle"> <div class="image pull-right" id="cq-textimage-jsp-/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0513/jcr:content/pagecontent/textimage" style="max-width: 50%;"> <img src="https://www1.villanova.edu/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0513/jcr%3acontent/pagecontent/textimage/image.img.jpg/1589404047802.jpg" alt="Jesse Couenhoven, PhD, a professor of Moral Theology in Villanova’s Department of Humanities and Department of Theology, is the project’s principal investigator. " title="" class="cq-dd-image" ><br> <small>The grant will fund a new research initiative directed by Jesse Couenhoven, PhD, a professor of Moral Theology in Villanova’s Department of Humanities and Department of Theology, and the project’s principal investigator. </small> </div> <div class="text"><p><i>Villanova, PA </i>– Villanova University’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) has received a three-year, $3.9 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation to explore how the theology of human nature engages scientific approaches to humanity. The largest grant ever received by CLAS, it will fund a new research initiative, “Collaborative Inquiries in Christian Theological Anthropology,” directed by Jesse Couenhoven, PhD, a professor of Moral Theology in Villanova’s Department of Humanities and the Department of Theology, and the project’s principal investigator.<b>  </b></p> <p>The interdisciplinary effort, supported by nearly $700,000 in additional contributions from Villanova, the University of Notre Dame, and 12 other colleges and universities, will explore how the theology of human nature engages with biology and the social sciences. Its primary goal is to nurture ambitious, science-engaged theological scholarship that addresses topics such as human flourishing, moral agency, freedom and the development of virtue.   </p> <p>The research project’s co-investigators are Gerald McKenny, PhD, Walter Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame, and Neil Arner, PhD, assistant professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. The grant will fund a team of more than 30 fellows, mentors and educational advisors to collaborate on long-term research projects. Institutions represented include faculty from Boston College, Cambridge University, Princeton Theological Seminary, University of St. Andrews, Wake Forest University and Yale University, among others. Activities will include six summer and winter workshops, through which the grant’s 15 researchers will learn from distinguished experts in a variety of fields and refine their work-in-progress. The grant will also sponsor numerous other presentations, publications and collaborations.   </p> <p>“This grant offers us a rare opportunity to develop new ways of relating religion and science, while exploring vital questions about what it means to live a good human life,” noted Dr. Couenhoven. “Such significant funding for interdisciplinary theological research is extremely unusual.”<br /> </p> <p>The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for discoveries relating to the deepest and most perplexing questions facing humankind—encouraging civil, informed dialogue among scientists, philosophers, and theologians, as well as between such experts and the public at large.    </p> <p>“Villanova is extremely proud that Dr. Couenhoven is leading the investigation of this critical topic,” said Amanda Grannas, PhD, associate vice provost for Research and Chief Research Officer. “This work is aligned with our institutional mission and belief that between true science and true religion there is no intrinsic conflict. This project will find new ways of relating religion and science, which ultimately will significantly benefit humanity.”</p> <p>Dr. Couenhoven’s teaching covers a wide range of issues in ethics, theology and philosophy. His research interests include the topics of free will, personal responsibility, theories of punishment, doctrines of grace, predestination, forgiveness and ethical theory. He is the author of two books, <i>Predestination: A Guide for the Perplexed </i>(T &amp; T Clark, 2018) and <i>Stricken by Sin, Cured by Christ: Agency, Necessity, and Culpability in Augustinian Theology</i> (Oxford University Press, 2013). Dr. Couenhoven received his doctorate in Religion from Yale University.<br />  <br /> <b><i>About Villanova University’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences</i></b><i>: Since its founding in 1842, Villanova University’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has cultivated knowledge, understanding and intellectual courage for a purposeful life in a challenging and changing world. With 39 majors across the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences, it is the oldest and largest of Villanova’s colleges, serving more than 4,500 undergraduate and graduate students each year. The College is committed to a teacher-scholar model, offering outstanding undergraduate and graduate research opportunities and a rigorous core curriculum that prepares students to become critical thinkers, strong communicators and ethical leaders with a truly global perspective.</i></p> <p><b><i>About Villanova University: </i></b><i>Since 1842, Villanova University’s Augustinian Catholic intellectual tradition has been the cornerstone of an academic community in which students learn to think critically, act compassionately and succeed while serving others. There are more than 10,000 undergraduate, graduate and law students in the University's six colleges—the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Villanova School of Business, the College of Engineering, the M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, the College of Professional Studies and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. Ranked among the nation’s top universities, Villanova supports its students’ intellectual growth and prepares them to become ethical leaders who create positive change everywhere life takes them. For more, visit </i><a href="http://www.villanova.edu"><i>www.villanova.edu</i></a><i>. </i></p> </div><div class="clear"></div></div>Villanova University’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) has received a three-year, $3.9 million grant from the John Templeton Foundation to explore how the theology of human nature engages scientific approaches to humanity. The largest grant ever received by CLAS, it will fund a new research initiative directed by Jesse Couenhoven, PhD, a professor of Moral Theology in Villanova’s Department of Humanities and Department of Theology, and the project’s principal investigator. https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/05132020-05-13T21:09:39.587Z2020-05-13T21:09:39.587ZVillanova Theology Professor’s New Book Examines the Global and Liminal Catholicism of Pope Francisnoemail@noemail.orgkcurley3<div class="textimage parbase rightimage nostyle"> <div class="image pull-right" id="cq-textimage-jsp-/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0511/jcr:content/pagecontent/textimage" style="max-width: 50%;"> <img src="https://www1.villanova.edu/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0511/jcr%3acontent/pagecontent/textimage/image.img.jpg/1589221184795.jpg" alt="A photo of Massimo Faggioli (white, middle-aged man with glasses wearing a suit), next to a photo of the cover of his book." title="" class="cq-dd-image" ><br> </div> <div class="text"><p><i>VILLANOVA, Pa. –</i> In the more than 2,000-year history of the Catholic Church, Pope Francis is the first pope to reassess the relationship between the papacy and the bishops, and one of the first to boldly advocate for the poor from the perspective of a truly global Catholic Church. This is how Massimo Faggioli, PhD, professor of Theology and Religious Studies at Villanova University, describes today’s pontificate in his new book <i>The Liminal Papacy of Pope Francis: Moving Toward Global Catholicity</i> (Orbis Books, 2020). In this book, Dr. Faggioli examines Francis’ global papacy in today’s cultural and social media-driven world and unveils the importance of Pope Francis’ “liminal” papacy.</p> <p>To understand Dr. Faggioli’s use of the term “liminal,” it’s important to note the concept of border is key to Pope Francis. The border is never just a <i>limes</i>, meaning rigid frontier in Latin, but it also always <i>limen, </i>the Latin word for threshold. The liminality of Francis’ pontificate lies in his reinterpretation of the borders—no boundary can claim to exclude “the other,” since the boundary, by definition, implies “the other.”</p> <p>Dr. Faggioli describes Francis’ papacy as “liminal” because he purposefully focuses his work on the boundaries of traditional outreach. He is intentional in his attention to the poor, the peripheries, and the relationship between the Church and other religions. Compiled from an extensive knowledge about global politics, papal biographies, history and documents of Vatican II, Dr. Faggioli contextualizes and analyzes Francis’ ongoing papacy.</p> <p>&quot;In a single, concise, and digestible volume, Massimo Faggioli pulls off a minor miracle: a wide-angled, authoritative interpretation of the epochal shift of the Francis pontificate even while it is still in full flow” says reviewer Austen Ivereigh, author and journalist. “[Faggioli] shows Francis boldly grasping that history's turning wheels demand a new Christian inculturation, one that requires not just reform but a renewal of mindset, culture and custom. A masterful interpretation of a pivotal papacy.”</p> <p><i>The Liminal Papacy of Pope Francis </i>is part of a new book series, “Catholicity in an Evolving Universe,” under the direction of another Villanova professor, Ilia Delio, OSF, PhD, the Josephine C. Connelly Endowed Chair in Theology.</p> <p>An expert in the papacy, Vatican II, liturgical reform, and Catholicism and global politics, Dr. Faggioli is a frequent contributor in national and international media outlets, including <i>The Washington Post</i>, <i>New York Times</i>, <i>National Public Radio</i>, <i>La Croix International</i> and <i>National Catholic Reporter</i>. <i>The Liminal Papacy</i> is his 11th book. Dr. Faggioli received his PhD in Religious History from the University of Turin in 2002. He continued his studies on the Second Vatican Council at the John XXIII Foundation for Religious Studies in Bologna, Italy. At Villanova, he teaches courses on modern Church history, Catholicism and world politics, and ecclesiology at the undergraduate and graduate level.</p> <p><b><i>About Villanova University’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences</i></b><i>: Since its founding in 1842, Villanova University’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has cultivated knowledge, understanding and intellectual courage for a purposeful life in a challenging and changing world. With 39 majors across the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences, it is the oldest and largest of Villanova’s colleges, serving more than 4,500 undergraduate and graduate students each year. The College is committed to a teacher-scholar model, offering outstanding undergraduate and graduate research opportunities and a rigorous core curriculum that prepares students to become critical thinkers, strong communicators and ethical leaders with a truly global perspective.</i></p> </div><div class="clear"></div></div>In the more than 2,000-year history of the Catholic Church, Pope Francis is the first pope to reassess the relationship between the papacy and the bishops, and one of the first to boldly advocate for the poor from the perspective of a truly global Catholic Church. This is how Massimo Faggioli, PhD, professor of Theology and Religious Studies at Villanova University, describes today’s pontificate in his new book The Liminal Papacy of Pope Francis: Moving Toward Global Catholicity (Orbis Books, 2020).https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/05112020-05-11T18:19:44.819Z2020-05-11T18:19:44.819ZTony Chennault ’14 CLAS Selected as Recipient of the Villanova University Alumni Association’s Young Alumni Medalnoemail@noemail.orgzchizar<div class="textimage parbase rightimage nostyle"> <div class="image pull-right" id="cq-textimage-jsp-/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0507-1/jcr:content/pagecontent/textimage" style="max-width: 316px;"> <img src="https://www1.villanova.edu/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0507-1/jcr%3acontent/pagecontent/textimage/image.img.jpg/1588853995838.jpg" alt="Tony Chennault" title="Tony Chennault" class="cq-dd-image" ><br> </div> <div class="text"><p><i>VILLANOVA,</i> <i>Pa.</i> –  The Villanova University Alumni Association (VUAA) has named alumnus and former Villanova men’s basketball player Tony Chennault ’14 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS), as its 2020 Young Alumni Medal recipient. The award honors alumni who have made outstanding contributions to one or more areas of society, including professional, academic and service to the University. Chennault will be presented with the Young Alumni Medal later this year.</p> <p>“We are proud to present the Young Alumni Medal each year to an alumnus/a who has reached a significant level of achievement in his/her profession and who is a model of the quality and caliber of today’s Villanova student,” said George Kolb, Associate Vice President for Alumni Relations. “Tony’s work is a clear example of the commitment to the Augustinian ideals of truth, unity and love, and we find it inspiring not only in how he has represented his alma mater through this film and community work, but in how he has demonstrated the importance of a community dedicated to service to others.”</p> <p>A 29-year-old filmmaker, entrepreneur and Philadelphia native, Chennault was raised by his mother, Crystal Morton. He learned the true meaning of hard work watching her work multiple jobs, and he learned his passion for the game of basketball on the playgrounds of Philadelphia. Prior to his time at Villanova, Chennault won two consecutive Philadelphia Catholic League high-school basketball championships at Neumann-Goretti. After high school, Chennault decided to attend Wake Forest University and later transferred to Villanova, where he played two years for head coach Jay Wright and was a key contributor off the bench for the Wildcats.</p> <p>“The thing I love most about the Villanova community is the unity we have amongst each other,” Chennault says. “The sense of pride that Villanovans have is unique. Villanova’s mantra is &quot;ignite change&quot; and I wanted the work I do in the world to be meaningful that can help push that culture forward.”</p> <p>Chennault’s mission is to produce narrative driven stories that can drive social change and reframe the way people of color are represented in mainstream television. When his older brother and father-figure, Mike Jay, was killed as an innocent bystander in a drive-by shooting in 2012 and his mother Crystal passed away nine months later, he decided to redirect his focus to filmmaking.</p> <p>After graduating from Villanova in 2014, Chennault started an online web series, <i>Oldhead</i>, which highlights the socio-economic issues within the urban, black and brown community. Named after a slang term used to mean an authority figure who passes their wisdom down to a younger generation, the series has accumulated over 1.5 million views on Chennault’s YouTube channel, and is currently in production on their third season. Chennault won Best Director for his work at the Ekiah Film Festival. His screenplay Dollar Party won the Act Up! Screenwriters competition at the Hip Hop Film Festival Chennault.</p> <p>Chennault has remained involved with the University through his participation in Villanova on Set, a program designed to expose Villanova students to the various facets of the Hollywood television and film industry, was the keynote speaker for the 2014 CLAS convocation ceremony and conducted a speaking tour for his documentary, <i>In Transition</i>, at different VUAA clubs around the country.</p> <p><b><i>About Villanova University:</i></b> <i>Since 1842, Villanova University’s Augustinian Catholic intellectual tradition has been the cornerstone of an academic community in which students learn to think critically, act compassionately and succeed while serving others. There are more than 10,000 undergraduate, graduate and law students in the University's six colleges—the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Villanova School of Business, the College of Engineering, the M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, the College of Professional Studies and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. Ranked among the nation’s top universities, Villanova supports its students’ intellectual growth and prepares them to become ethical leaders who create positive change everywhere life takes them. For more, visit </i><a href="http://www.villanova.edu/"><b><i>www.villanova.edu</i></b></a><i>.</i></p> </div><div class="clear"></div></div>The award honors alumni who have made outstanding contributions to one or more areas of society, including professional, academic and service to the University. Chennault will be presented with the Young Alumni Medal later this year.https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0507-12020-05-07T20:37:11.820Z2020-05-07T20:37:11.820ZThomas Sanzone ’68 to Receive the 2020 St. Thomas of Villanova Alumni Medalnoemail@noemail.orgzchizar<div class="text parbase"><h3><b>The St. Thomas of Villanova Alumni Medal is the highest award given by the Villanova University&nbsp;Alumni Association</b></h3> </div> <div class="textimage parbase rightimage nostyle"> <div class="image pull-right" id="cq-textimage-jsp-/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0507/jcr:content/pagecontent/textimage" style="max-width: 275px;"> <img src="https://www1.villanova.edu/content/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/0507/jcr%3acontent/pagecontent/textimage/image.img.jpg/1588796304912.jpg" alt="Thomas Sanzone" title="sanzone" class="cq-dd-image" ><br> </div> <div class="text"><p><i>VILLANOVA</i>, <i>Pa.</i> ‑ The Villanova University Alumni Association (VUAA) has announced the selection of Thomas Sanzone ’68 College of Engineering (COE), as the recipient of its 2020 St. Thomas of Villanova Alumni Medal. The medal is the highest award given by the VUAA and is presented each year to alumni for outstanding service and to those who best symbolize the spirit and legacy of St. Thomas of Villanova. Sanzone will be recognized and formally receive the award this fall.</p> <p>“Tom is the embodiment of what the St. Thomas of Villanova Alumni Medal signifies in our community,” said George Kolb, Associate Vice President for Alumni Relations. “A tireless advocate and dedicated volunteer for the University, he exemplifies the power of our alumni giving back to the University in ways that have a positive impact on future generations of Villanovans.”</p> <p>A charter member and founding vice president of the Villanova Club of Houston, Sanzone has participated in chapter leadership and events since 1972. In 2012, he and his wife established the Brenda F. and Thomas V. Sanzone ’68 Endowed Scholarship in the College of Engineering. He has been a benefactor to the University through his memberships in the President’s Club, Caritas Society, 1842 Heritage Society and The Matthew Carr Society. He has received the College of Engineering Professional Achievement Award and served on the VUAA Board of Directors from 2011-2017. An active volunteer for the Office of University Admission, he enjoys supporting local college fairs, mentoring prospective and current students and encouraging Texas high school students to attend Villanova.</p> <p>“I am honored to be recognized by the Alumni Association with the Saint Thomas of Villanova Alumni Medal,” Sanzone said. “I share this award in spirit with Villanovans that have become family to me. In this day and age of dramatic and rapid societal change, there is one thing that is ageless and unchanging at Villanova, and that is the Augustinian values, which have not wavered for more than 175 years.”</p> <p>After graduating from Villanova, Sanzone enjoyed a 51-year career at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston. He most recently served as Senior Executive for Engineering for MRI Technologies from 2011 to 2019. He was previously employed by Hamilton Sundstrand beginning in 1968 and served as Houston Office General Manager from 1986 until his retirement in 2011. Sanzone supported the company’s efforts during the Apollo program, training Apollo astronauts—including Neil Armstrong—in the use of the company’s Portable Life Support System that was successfully used on the moon. He was a charter member of the JSC Joint Leadership Team and a recipient of the NASA Exceptional Public Service Medal. Sanzone is an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and a recipient of the Rotary National Award for Space Achievement Stellar Award.</p> <p>A passionate supporter of Villanova Athletics, Sanzone has attended five Final Four appearances by the men’s basketball program. During the 1971 Final Four in Houston, Sanzone provided a tour of the Johnson Space Center to Villanova players, coaches and their families.</p> <p>Since 1995, the St. Thomas of Villanova Alumni Medal has been given to those who have achieved a significant level of distinction within their career field and have made a major impact on their community, the University and the Alumni Association.</p> <p><b><i>About Villanova University:</i></b> <i>Since 1842, Villanova University’s Augustinian Catholic intellectual tradition has been the cornerstone of an academic community in which students learn to think critically, act compassionately and succeed while serving others. There are more than 10,000 undergraduate, graduate and law students in the University's six colleges—the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Villanova School of Business, the College of Engineering, the M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, the College of Professional Studies and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. Ranked among the nation’s top universities, Villanova supports its students’ intellectual growth and prepares them to become ethical leaders who create positive change everywhere life takes them. For more, visit </i><a href="http://www.villanova.edu/"><i>www.villanova.edu</i></a><i>.</i><b></b></p> </div><div class="clear"></div></div>The medal is the highest award given by the VUAA and is presented each year to alumni for outstanding service and to those who best symbolize the spirit and legacy of St. Thomas of Villanova. Sanzone will be recognized and formally receive the award this fall.https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/media/pressreleases/2020/05072020-05-07T12:14:57.248Z2020-05-07T12:14:57.248Z